Dental morphology of the Procyonidae with a description of Cynarctoides, gen. nov

Cover of: Dental morphology of the Procyonidae with a description of Cynarctoides, gen. nov | Paul Orman McGrew

Published by Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Procyonidae,
  • Teeth

Edition Notes

Book details

Statementby Paul O. McGrew --
SeriesFieldiana -- v. 6, no. 22, Field Museum of Natural History. Geological series -- v. VI, no. 22, Field Museum of Natural History. [Publication] -- no. 427, Publication (Field Museum of Natural History : 1909) -- 427, Publication (Field Museum of Natural History : 1909) -- v. 6, no. 22
The Physical Object
Paginationp. 323-339 :
Number of Pages339
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24861579M
LC Control Number40000018
OCLC/WorldCa4474124

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Additional Physical Format: Online version: McGrew, Paul Orman, Dental morphology of the Procyonidae, with a description of Cynarctoides, gen. nov. Dental Morphology of the Procyonidae pattern is simple with four subequal cusps forming a square.

The paracone, metacone, and protocone are easily recognizable and are much the same as those gen. nov book the more primitive genera, occupying the same relative positions.

Download PDF: Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s): ersitylibrary (external link)Author: Paul Orman McGrew.

Dental Morphology of the Procyonidae with a Description of Cynarctoides, Gen. Nov. Volume Fieldiana, Geology, Vol.6, No (Paperback) McGrew Paul Orman Published by Hardpress Publishing, United States (). Dental morphology of the Procyonidae with a description of Cynarctoides, gen.

nov. / by Paul O. McGrew -- By Paul Orman McGrew Topics: Procyonidae, TeethAuthor: Paul Orman McGrew. Dental Morphology of the Procyonidae with a Description of Cynarctoides, Gen.

Nov. Ga naar zoeken Ga naar hoofdinhoud. lekker winkelen zonder zorgen. Gratis verzending va- Bezorging dezelfde dag, 's avonds of in het weekend*. The dental formula is 3/3, 1/1, /, 2/ = Procyonids are omnivorous. They consume both plant and animal material, including small mammals and birds.

The Procyonidae is a member of the canoid subgroup of carnivores. Their geologic history is old, going back to the late Eocene.

Technical characters. Literature and references cited. molecular supermatrix and a morphological character matrix comprised mostly of dental characters [Baskin, J.A., Bassariscus and Probassariscus (Mammalia, Carnivora, Procyonidae) from the early Barstovian (Middle Miocene).

Vert. Paleo. 24, ] may be due. Dental Morphology of the Procyonidae, with a Description of Cynarctoides, gen. NOV. By Paul O. McGrew A New Amphicyon from the Deep River Miocene. Figure Dental evolution of representative canids as shown in upper cheek teeth (P4 – M2).

Generally the most derived species in each genus is chosen to enhance a sense of dental diversity. Bassariscus and Probassariscus (Mammalia, Carnivora, Procyonidae) from the early Barstovian (Middle Miocene). Vert. Paleo. 24, ] may be due to non-independence among atomized dental characters that does not take into account the high developmental genetic correlation of these characters.

Dental morphology of the Procyonidae with a description of Cynarctoides, gen. nov. View Metadata. By: McGrew, Paul Orman, Publication info: Chicago:Field Museum of Natural History, Holding Institution: University Library, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign.

Dental Morphology of the Procyonidae, with a Description of Cynarctoides, Gen. Nov. By Paul O. McGrew. 18 pages, 10 illus. A New Amphicyon from the Deep River Miocene.

Paul O. McGrew. 10 pages, 5 illus. New Pantodonta and Dinocerta from the Upper Paleocene of. McGrew P. () Dental morphology of the Procyonidae with a description of Cynarctoides, gen. nov., Geological Series, Field Museum of Natural History 6 22, Carroll R.

(), Vertebrate Paleontology and Evolution, PDF | On Jan 1,Xiaoming Wang and others published Fossil dogs (Carnivora, Canidae) from the Dental morphology of the Procyonidae with a description of Cynarctoides and Vaqueros formations in Southern California, with comments on relationships of Phlaocyon.

Dental morphology of the Procyonidae with a description of Cynarctoides, gen. nov. View Metadata. By: McGrew, Paul Orman, Containing a full description of the periods when the teeth are cut; the appearances they present, the tricks to which they are exposed, the eccentricities to which they are liable, and the diseases to which they are.

Building on this new specimen, a new phylogenetic hypothesis is proposed for Lophiodontidae, based on a cladistic analysis of dental, cranial and mandibular characters.

The specimen displays a unique morphology that leads us to propose the new genus and species Eolophiodon laboriense. ABSTRACT Members of the early Cenozoic family Plagiomenidae possess highly derived cheekteeth that phenetically resemble those of extant colugos (Galeopithecidae, Dermoptera), although the two groups notably differ in details of cusp morphology and in the form of the anterior teeth.

Whether these dental resemblances should be considered as evidence of close, shared ancestry or merely as a set. defined to the base of the protoconid in Cynarctoides), (2) the position of the interoconid (on the crest immediately posterior to the metaconid in Cynarctoides; in the talonid notch in Nothocyon, except Nothocyon 0 5mm X1 Xl.

FIGURE A) Cynarctoides sp., M, UF ; B) Cynorca sp., M, UF ; C) Camelidae, n. gen. et sp., P4, UF   REFERENCES: • Wheeler’s of dental anatomy, physiology, and occlusion • Pediatric Dentistry, By Muthu • Textbook of Dental Anatomy and Tooth Morphology, By Kumar • Anatomy of Primary Teeth, Steven Chussid D.D.S.

• UP TO DATE in • DENTAL ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY,BY:Prof. Nahed A. Khalil, Head of Oral Biology Departmen. The cladistic analysis supports the setting of E. laboriense nov. gen., nov. as a new genus and species, and as the sister group of the clade gathering Lophiodon and Paralophiodon.

The Lophiodontidae, prevalent in European Eocene environments, seemed to appear in. Dental morphology of the Procyonidae with a description of cynarctoides, gen. nov. Geological Series of the Field Museum of Natural History: 10/31/ Buisnictis: burrowsi: Hibbard: Class Mammalia: Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History: 7/10/ transactio;-':s of the nebraska academy sul~n.s.

notes regarding skull characteristics of oxetocyrxv cusp}[)a tus green, (mammalia, canidae). Kinkajou skull (Dental formula: I3/3, I 1/1, PM3/3, M 2/2 = 36). The kinkajou (Potos flavus) which lives in the forest of Central and South America is herbivorous, feeding on fruit and nectar.

It has a shorter than average muzzle and a very long thin tongue for obtaining nectar from flowers. Description of third premolar is anteroposteriorly elongate.

There are four cusps in line: a large protocone, a smaller posterior accessory cusp, and in line with these, an anterior and a posterior cingular cusp. A weak labial cingulum extends the length of the tooth.

Reproduction: Reproduction is either sexual or asexual; asexual binary reproduction occurs by fission, multiple fission, budding or sporulation and sexual reproduction occurs by gamete formation or conjugation. Binary fission may be simple or transverse or longitudinal or oblique. Life cycle often exhibits alternation of generation, i.e.

it includes asexual and sexual phases. Genus Corumictis Paterson, gen. nov. :actE3FEADC9D-BE7C Type species. Corumictis wolsani Paterson et al. Diagnosis. Mustelid of small size with paired temporal crests. P4 large with anteriorly placed, conical protocone.

M1 possesses a large parastylar shelf and lacks a postprotocrista. Written by experts in different areas, this book presents an up-to-date account of the behavioral biology of dogs.

Split in three parts, the book addresses the specific aspects of behavioral biology. The first part deals with the evolution and development of the dog, whereas the. McGrew, P.O.,Dental morphology of the Procyonidae with a description of Cynarctoides, gen.

nov: Geological Series of Field Museum of Natural History, v. 6, p. – Procyonid, (family Procyonidae), any of a group of tree-climbing mammals comprising raccoons, coatis, olingos, the New World ringtail, the cacomistle, and the the 18 species are classified as carnivores, procyonids are actually omnivorous and are closely related to bears (family Ursidae).

Introduction. The first major effort to reconstruct the ancestry of the mammalian order Carnivora goes back over a century. As early asScott took particular note of numerous skeletal similarities among carnivorans from the late Eocene to early Oligocene of western North America, such as the nimravid Dinictis, the amphicyonid Daphoenus (then regarded as a canid), and the canid Hesperocyon.

This banner text can have markup. web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation. Volume 1: Terrestrial Carnivores, Ungulates, and Ungulatelike Mammals 1'Janis, C.

Scott, K. Jacobs, L. Cambridge Cambridge University Press ’ þïÿÿÿ. Osborn, H. a?The evolution, phylogeny, and classification of the Proboscidea American Museum Novitates 1üïÿÿÿ. m Wang, X. Tedford, R. OThe status. Procyonidae - cacomistle, coatis, raccoons, ringtails There are 18 species of small to medium-sized species in this family.

They are found in North, Central, and South America. They have medium to long tails, brown to gray fur, pointed noses, and rounded or pointed ears. Many species have masked faces and.

Phylogenetic position of the parasitoid nanoflagellate Pirsonia inferred from Nuclear-encoded small subunit ribosomal DNA and a description of Pseudopirsonia n. gen. and Pseudopirsonia mucosa (Drebes) comb. nov. Protist. [C,L]. Cycadeoidea, a genus of extinct seed plants that was common worldwide during the Early Cretaceous Epoch ( million to million years ago).

It was one member in a larger group, the order Bennettitales (known as the order Cycadeoidales in some classifications), which has been evolutionarily. Carnivora is an order of placental mammals that have specialized in primarily eating flesh. Its members are formally referred to as carnivorans, though some species are omnivorous, such as raccoons and bears, and quite a few species such as pandas are specialized herbivores.

The word 'carnivore' is derived from Latin carō (stem carn-) "flesh" and vorāre "to devour", it refers to any meat. We describe tritylodontid remains from the Lower Cretaceous Kuwajima Formation (Tetori Group) in central Japan as representing a new genus, Montirictus kuwajimaensis, gen. et sp. nov.

Montirictus is a medium-sized tritylodontid genus characterized by upper cheek teeth having the cusp formula with subequal cusps, buccal and lingual cusps retaining a crescentic shape with both buccal and.

The Hemingfordian North American Land Mammal Age is not well sampled, especially in the Pacific Northwest. Here we present both a description of a new fauna and two radiometric dates, Ma and Ma, constraining the Hawk Rim locality of central Oregon.

Hawk Rim represents the first diverse late Hemingfordian fauna in the Northwest and is one of the stratigraphically lowest. From the dental sac, this tissue begins to form the periodontal ligament adjacent to the newly formed cementum. Pulp. This is formed from the central cells of the dental papilla and is surrounded by the newly formed dentin.

Dentinocemental Junction DCJ. An animal like Thrinaxodon, in its cranial anatomy and dental morphology must be close to the ancestry of the earliest mammals.

Certain of its cheek teeth hear a striking similarity to those of the latest Triassic mammals. Another mammalian trend is seen in the lower jaw of Thrinaxodon. The teeth on either side were set into a single bone, the.

Ferrequitherium sweeti gen. et sp. nov. from the Trainspotting locality, and Horolodectes sunae from the DW-2 locality, Palaeocene Paskapoo Formation of Alberta, Canada. A–B, Ferrequitherium sweetigen. et sp. nov. TMPincomplete left maxilla with P4, M1–2 in occlusal view (A).

TMPleft M3 in occlusal view (B).Start studying Embryology - Cranialfacial Development. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

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